U.S. Automobiles during World War II

Photos above: 1941 Plymouth in both an official city taxi and a small town taxi configuration

In cities or large towns, taxi cab fleet, like Yellow Cab, had some type of support. Small towns like Seguin Texas struggled with whatever could be found because the auto industry converted 100% of its production to the war effort.

 

(*for example, Raymond Rosenbusch and his General Motors M-1 carbine- see his link ) so there were no new automobiles from 1942 until 1946.  Sgt.FC. Raymond Rosenbusch was interviewed for his participation in the Battle Of Bastogne. General Motors' Inland Manufacturing built nearly half of the M-1 Carbines of World War II; over 2.6 million of the total produced.

 

The last cars built in 1942 were sold to official organizations like police departments. It was not considered unusual for a police officer to drive a Cadillac or other luxury car. Taxis, on the other hand, bought and patched whatever they could. Gasoline was not strictly rationed for taxi companies but mileage was carefully scrutinized. Every fare had to be documented.

Baltimore Police Officer with a luxury 1942 Packard Clipper
Cars like this were not used harshly like patrol duty
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1942 Ford coupes reserved for police needing new patrol cars.